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Small Designs Magazine

Small Designs Magazine

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Old books and vinils turned into pieces of art

Audrey Ruby is a great artist that turns old books and vinils into unique pieces of art and sell them on RetroGrandma Etsy shop.
I talked to her and she told me how she does it:

Handmade objects always have a story. They have a real character and charm over mass-produced items.

I've been crafting for years and loved every minute of it - it's my relaxation time. Some of the crafting I've done in the past involves sewing, ceramics, crocheting, knitting, plastic canvas.....and now I love to make unique items out of books and records:  book purses, IPhone docking stations, hollow book shelves, invisible bookshelves, book lamps, record clocks, book tablet device covers, record handbags, record bowls and containers, and record bookends. 


My favorite are the book purses.  I have made a large number of them over the years and never got tired of making them, as each one is unique.  How cool is it to walk down the street with one of these and see heads turn in amazement! 

I love searching for treasures at garage sales and thrift stores and this is where I pick up all my gently used records and books.

All of my unique items will spark conversation!  I’ve been creating these items for 8 years now and have had an Etsy store to share my creations since then.  I’ve done many custom orders for customers as they send me their special books to create one of my items for them – mainly book purses.   

My shop name tells you I'm a Grandma and I also love retro. I have a vintage shop also on Etsy:  http://www.retroclassics.etsy.com - which is a Blast From the Past!







Friday, January 16, 2015

3D car printed in front of customers at Detroit Motor Show

Detroit Motor Show came with a premiere this year: the first car to be printed right in front of the customers. Arizona-based start-up Local Motors brought this invention to the show and people could also ride the car.

The Strati, as it’s called, is a two-seated that can go up to 40 kilometers per hour and is meant for short, urban trips. It can be manufactured in just over a day. Jay Rogers, CEO of Local Motors, the car’s manufacturer said that he hopes to be able to build this vehicle closer to 24 hours, by the end of the year.


The car’s frame and panels are printed out of carbon fibre-infused plastic, on a machine that could fit in a single-car garage. Made up of more than 200 layers, it weighs some 800 kilos – that’s more than half the weight of an average car in the US.

The car's expectancy is to be at least half a decade. Jay Rogers explains that "if you left it outside in the harshest of elements, you’d have probably five to six years of use. If you garage it and you use it like you would use a normal car, then it will last for much longer".

Also, the car is recyclable. "If it gets cracked or hurt or other things like that, you can take the components off that are not recyclable and recycle the material, get a credit for the cost of the material, and have a new vehicle,” said Jay Rogers.


The Strati will be available this year at a cost of between 15.000 and 25.000 euros.